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Comments from a passionate fan of old movies

“Three Guys Named Mike” - Airline Stewardess Romantic Comedy
released on March 1, 1951
running time 1 hour and 30 minutes

The Actors: Jane Wyman (Marcy Lewis), Van Johnson (Mike Lawrence), Howard Keel (Captain Mike Jamison), Barry Sullivan (Mike Tracy), Phyllis Kirk (Kathy Hunter) Anne Sargent (Jan Baker), Jeff Donnell (Alice Reymend), Herbert Heyes (Scott Bellamy), Robert Sherwood (Benson - co-pilot), Don McGuire (MacWade Parker), Barbara Billingsley (Ann White), Hugh Sanders (Mr. Williams), John Maxwell (Dr. Matthew Hardy), Lewis Martin C.R. Smith), Ethel Welles (herself, Ethel 'Pug' Welles), Sydney Mason (Osgood), Percy Helton (Mr. Hawkins the hotel manager), Herb Vigran (Mr. Kirk, the second 'wolf' on the plane), Joel Allen (airport worker), John Alvin (flight dispatcher Brown), Jessie Arnold (Convair passenger), Parley Baer (bakery truck driver), Bill Baldwin (the milkman)

The Stewardess and Her Men

Three Guys Named MikeOh, the Good-Old-Days. On September 11, . . . . You know which year, . . . The experience of flying commercial airlines changed forever. In my humble opinion, flying today isn’t the most fun thing that I can think of. Actually, flying is wonderful, but getting from the parking lot to the plane seat is the daunting challenge. But back in 1951, flying was a fun adventure, as this story will show.

Jane Wyman, Ronald Regan’s first wife, is Marcy Lewis, a small-town girl who becomes a stewardess for American Airlines. Her first flight, from Cleveland to Nashville, is a comedy of errors that could possibly doom her young career.

The pilot on her first flight, Mike Jamison (Howard Keel), who she thoroughly offended on the way to the airport, convinces the powers-that-be to give her another chance, and it looks like he’s falling for this beautiful young stewardess.

Unfortunately, she gets transferred to Chicago before they have a chance to bond. She meets the second Mike on her first flight out of Chicago, handsome Mike Lawrence (Van Johnson). It looks like she may get to know him better, but she lets a little girl's dog join them and the havoc created keeps them apart the rest of the flight.

When she gets to Hollywood from Chicago, she discovers that the room that she and her partner are staying in is really old-fashioned, so four stewardesses decide to pool their money and buy a house. On this house hunt she meets the third Mike, Mike Tracy (Barry Sullivan), an advertising executive

All three Mike’s will fall in love the stewardess, and towards the end of the movie Marcy finally decides that she is ready for a home and a family. What luck, all three Mike’s meet Marcy on the airport runway as she is about to board an airplane for her next flight. All three Mike’s propose to Marcy one at a time as the others are watching. . . And Marcy makes her decision. Pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter drizzled over it and enjoy the show.

The story of White Kernel Popcorn —»
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Jimbo
 
 

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