The New York Hat (December 5, 19124)

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The Ritz Brothers
 

Released on December 5, 1912: A dying mother whispers her wishes to the pastor asking him to use her savings to occasionally buy luxury items for her daughter, but when he buys a new hat for the girl the town thinks he is having an affair with the young girl.

Produced by D.W. Griffith

Directed by D.W. Griffith

The Actors: Mary Pickford (Miss Mollie Harding), Lionel Barrymore (preacher Bolton), Charles Hill Mailes (Mr. Harding, the father), Kate Bruce (Mrs. Harding, the mother), Alfred Paget (the doctor), Claire McDowell (first gossip), Mae Marsh (second gossip), Clara T. Bracy (third gossip), Madge Kirby (shopkeeper and lady at mother's deathbed), Lillian Gish (customer in shop and lady outside church), Jack Pickford (youth outside church), Robert Harron (youth outside church), Gertrude Bambrick (customer in shop and outside church), Kathleen Butler (window shopper), John T. Dillon (church board member), Dorothy Gish (unknown), James Kirkwood (unknown), Adolph Lestina (church board member), Walter P. Lewis (church board member), Marguerite Marsh (window shopper), W.C. Robinson (customer in shop), Mack Sennett (unknown)

 

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The Girl and the Gorilla, or How History was Made

In 1912 there were a handful of moving picture producers including inventor Thomas Edison, but while Edison was producing moving picture stories D.W. Griffith, over at the Biograph Company, was producing movie stars. One of those early D.W. Griffith stars was teenager Mary Pickford who went from a successful stage career to motion pictures at the age of 17. In 1912, at the age of 20, Mary Pickford did what everyone else feared to do . . . she quit. D.W. Griffith was the gorilla in the room when the topic was motion pictures, and you said, "Yes Mr. Griffith" . . . or you went to work somewhere else. Mary Pickford had a history-making argument with Griffith during the filming of a movie and after filming wrapped up she went directly to Broadway producer David Belasco who immediately offered her the leading role in his upcoming production of "A Good Little Devil." The Girl with the Golden Hair then went back to the Biograph studios and did something that made everyone gasp in horror . . . she marched defiantly onto the stage where D.W. Griffith was in the middle of a scene and interrupted the great man in the middle of his work . . . No one . . . I mean NO ONE . . . interrupted the Great D.W. Griffith in the middle of a scene . . . But Mary Pickford was not your average movie star . . . she informed D.W. Griffith that she had made her last movie with him and was returning to the stage . . . . before she left a teary-eyed Griffith persuaded her to act in one more movie . . . just one more short movie before returning to a stage career. This is that movie . . . Most short movie stories in 1912 had 3, or 4, or maybe 6 actors, but in Mary Pickford's final two reel movie there were more than twenty credited actors who wanted to appear in her final movie, including her brother Jack and future legends Lillian Gish and Mack Sennett . . . and the leading man was a very young Lionel Barrymore. By the way, after returning to the stage it didn't take Mary Pickford very long to realize that her passion was motion pictures . . . but she never returned to D.W. Griffith and Biograph Studios . . . Mary Pickford founded her own motion picture studio and went on to not only star in her own productions, but founded United Artists and was one of the 36 original founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science, and became a 'mover and shaker' behind the camera who largely helped create the motion picture industry as it is today. One of her famous sayings that I take to heart is, "this thing we call 'failure' is not the falling down but the staying down." Pop a little bowl of popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter on it and enjoy Mary Pickford's final motion picture for D.W. Griffith and the Biograph Company.

Charles Hill Mailes and Mary Pickford
Charles Hill Mailes and Mary Pickford
Charles Hill Mailes and Mary Pickford
Charles Hill Mailes and Mary Pickford
Kate Bruce, Alfred Pagent, Lionel Barrymore and Charles Hill Mailes
Kate Bruce, Alfred Pagent, Lionel Barrymore and Charles Hill Mailes
Lionel Barrymore in 1912
Lionel Barrymore in 1912
Lionel Barrymore, Mary Pickford and Charles Hill Mailes
Lionel Barrymore, Mary Pickford and Charles Hill Mailes
Lionel Barrymore and Mary Pickford
Lionel Barrymore and Mary Pickford
Lionel Barrymore reads the trust to Mary Pickford and the church deacons
Lionel Barrymore reads the trust to Mary Pickford and the church deacons
Mary Pickford gets a visit from Lionel Barrymore
Mary Pickford gets a visit from Lionel Barrymore
Lionel Barrymore
Lionel Barrymore
Madge Kirby and Claire McDowell
Madge Kirby and Claire McDowell
Madge Kirby and Lionel Barrymore
Madge Kirby and Lionel Barrymore
Madge Kirby holds the New York Hat
Madge Kirby holds the New York Hat
Madge Kirby
Madge Kirby
Mary Pickford
Mary Pickford
Mary Pickford and Charles Hill Mailes
Mary Pickford and Charles Hill Mailes
Mary Pickford, Lionel Barrymore and Charles Hill Mailes
Mary Pickford, Lionel Barrymore and Charles Hill Mailes
Mary Pickford gets her New York hat
Mary Pickford gets her New York hat
Mary Pickford heads to town
Mary Pickford heads to town
Mary Pickford tells Lionel Barrymore that her father destroyed her new hat
Mary Pickford tells Lionel Barrymore that her father destroyed her new hat
Mary Pickford wants a new hat
Mary Pickford wants a new hat