The Law of Contact

The Return of Draw Egan (October 15, 1916)

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William S. Hart is cowboy Draw Egan
 

Released on October 15, 1916: An outlaw-turned-Marshal is blackmailed by one of his old gang to either help in a robbery or have his outlaw past exposed to the town.

Produced by Thomas H. Ince

Directed by William S. Hart

The Actors: William S. Hart (Draw Egan, aka William Blake), Margery Wilson (Myrtle Buckton), Robert McKim (Arizona Joe), Louise Glaum (Poppy), J.P. Lockney (Mat Buckton), Dorothy Benham (unknown), Hector Dion (William Cleves), J.H. Gilmour (unknown), Aggie Herring (twonswoman), George Marlo (James Gray), Samuel N. Niblack (unknown), Robert Vaughn (unknown), Leo Willis (fight starter in bar)

 

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What if you didn't care? . . .

I was enjoying dinner last week with a friend and the topic of purchasing a new car came up. If money were no object, what kind of car would I purchase? I have thought about this before, and I decided that I would get a middle of the line model, and my reasoning was perfect . . . I thought . . . I would avoid the most expensive model because some of my friends who couldn't afford such a car might think that I was being pretentious . . . and I wouldn't get the least expensive model so that my friends with plenty of money wouldn't feel sorry for me because they thought that I could only afford the cheapest model. I thought my reasoning was perfect, and I had the perfect answer . . . until my friend tossed twelve words at me that rocked my world.

He asked, "What would you purchase if you didn't care what anyone else thinks?"

Our conversation moved on to other topics, but my mind was reeling with new thoughts. Why should I run my life by the thoughts and opinions of other people? If I do something that is right for me, but it offends someone else, or I know that someone else would advise me to do differently, should I instead do what other people think I should do? Should I live my life for other people, or for me? Wow . . . I gotta tell you . . . I am still meditating on this, but I am evolving to a new way of thinking, and am not sure yet exactly where I will finally end up.

How would YOUR life change if you did what YOU thought was the right thing, without any concern for what the people around you thought.

In this very early cowboy western adventure Draw Egan, the biggest outlaw-turned-Marshal faces this exact dilemma. The heat is on and outlaw Draw Egan, played by William Hart, the very first motion picture cowboy star, advises his gang to break up and lay low for a while. One day Egan goes into a small town saloon, and in this saloon there is man sitting in the corner who is the leading citizen of nearby Yellow Dog, and he is on a mission searching for a straight-shooting Marshal who can clean up the town. When he watches a gang of tough guys challenging Egan in the bar, he watches tough Egan stand up to the gang and its leader, and decides that this is the man that Yellow Dog needs, and offers him the job of Marshal. So the meanest outlaw in the territory becomes the new Marshal of Yellow Dog - what irony! When Egan gets to town he discovers the lovely daughter of the man who hired him and quickly decides that being on this side of the law won't be so bad after all, and everything is just ducky until . . . Arizona Joe, one of his old gang members hits town and wants Egan to help him rob the town blind, promising to tell the town and his sweetie that their Marshal is actually the biggest outlaw in the territory. Should Egan worry about what the townsfolk think of him if they know his past? Will his girlfriend discover his past, and if she does will he lose her? Should he care what other people think about him, or just be honest about who he is and what kind of man he is . . . and was? Pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter on it and enjoy the show.

Margery Wilson and William S. Hart
Margery Wilson and William S. Hart
J.P. Lockney
J.P. Lockney
J.P. Lockney
J.P. Lockney
J.P. Lockney and William S. Hart
J.P. Lockney and William S. Hart
Louise Glaum
Louise Glaum
Louise Glaum, Robert McKim and William Hart
Louise Glaum, Robert McKim and William Hart
William S. Hart and Louise Glaum
William S. Hart and Louise Glaum
Margery flirts with William S. Hart
Margery flirts with William S. Hart
Margery Wilson
Margery Wilson
Margery Wilson and William S. Hart
Margery Wilson and William S. Hart
Margery Wilson meets William S. Hart
Margery Wilson meets William S. Hart
Margery WIlson
Margery Wilson
Margery Wilson and William S. Hart
Margery Wilson and William S. Hart
Robert McKim
Robert McKim
Robert McKim and William S. Hart
Robert McKim and William S. Hart
Robert McKim
Robert McKim
Robert McKim in 1916
Robert McKim in 1916
Robert McKim and Louise Glaum
Robert McKim and Louise Glaum
William S. Hart
William S. Hart
William S. Hart
William S. Hart
William S. Hart faces Leo Willis
William S. Hart faces Leo Willis
William S. Hart and Robert McKim
William S. Hart and Robert McKim
William S. Hart in 1916
William S. Hart in 1916
William S. Hart proposes to Margery Wilson
William S. Hart proposes to Margery Wilson
William S. Hart
William S. Hart