Your Advertisement Here!

The Immigrant (June 17, 1917)

Loading the player...
Your Advertisement Here!
Charlie Chaplin leans over the railing
 

Released on June 17, 1917: Charlie Chaplin meets a young girl who is also emmigrating to the Land of Liberty.

Produced by Charles Chaplin

Directed by Charles Chaplin

The Actors: Charles Chaplin (the immigrant), Edna Purviance (immigrant), Eric Campbell (the head waiter), Albert Austin (a diner), Henry Bergman (the artist), Kitty Bradbury (mother), Frank J. Coleman (ship's officer and the restaurant owner), William Gillespie (cafe violinist), Tom Harrington (marriage registrar), James T. Kelley (shabby man in restaurant), John Rand (tipsy diner who cannot pay), Tiny Sandford (the cheater), Janet Sully (passenger), Loyal Underwood (small immigrant), Tom Wilson (gambler on ship)

 
Your Advertisement Here!

Free Download of the old movie The Immigrant
RIGHT-Click for PC, Control key + click for mac, Tap and hold for touch screen

The-Immigrant-1917.mp4 (108mb - 720x526)
The-Immigrant-1917-720p.mp4 (309mb - 960x720)

Holler New York

I was probably 8 or 9 years old when I remember having a terrible tummy ache. My mother tried to comfort me and at one point asked if I felt like 'hollering New York.' I had no idea what that phrase meant, and mom explained that as immigrants from Europe, like her grandfather, were heading to New York City aboard ships that often rocked wildly on the ocean waves, the passengers that were sea-sick would head to the railing and lean over and with the wish of being on solid ground instead of on the rocking ship would 'holler New York' . . . while giving the ocean the contents of their last meal. Did I 'holler New York' that day? . . . I don't remember . . . but I never forgot that whenever I needed to 'hug the porcelain god' or whatever phrase comes to mind today when about to lose my lunch, the term than many Americans used in the old days when we were a land that honored and welcomed immigrants searching for a better life was 'holler New York.' This short Charlie Chaplin comedy opens with Charlie apparently leaning over the ship's rail hollering New York, but in fact is actually catching a fish. Of course he tosses the fish near several sleeping men and soon they are hollering New York over the rail behind him. His fate is to play cards with a large man who steals all of the money from a mother lying on deck who is very sea-sick. Charlie wins the stolen money from the large man, played by Tiny Sandford, and later when Charlie meets the young daughter who is crying because all of mother's money is gone, he secretly tries to put his gambling winnings into her pocket, but is mistaken for a pickpocket by one of the ship's officers. This begins the adventure of moving to America by Charlie Chaplin and Edna Purviance . . . a story that unfolded in similar fashion for many of our ancestors as they immigrated to America and in the process met the love of their lives. Pop a little bowl of white kernel popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter on it and enjoy the show.

Charlie Chaplin and Albert Austin
Charlie Chaplin and Albert Austin
Charlie Chaplin and Edna Purviance
Charlie Chaplin and Edna Purviance
Charlie Chaplin and Edna Purviance in the cafe
Charlie Chaplin and Edna Purviance in the cafe
Charlie Chaplin and Tiny Sandford
Charlie Chaplin and Tiny Sandford
Charlie Chaplin meets Edna Purviance in the Cafe
Charlie Chaplin meets Edna Purviance in the Cafe
Charlie Chaplin looks back at the pretty girl
Charlie Chaplin looks back at the pretty girl
Edna Purviance aboard ship
Edna Purviance aboard ship
Edna Purviance 1917
Edna Purviance 1917
Frank J. COleman, Charlie Chaplin and Edna Purviance
Frank J. COleman, Charlie Chaplin and Edna Purviance
Frank J. Coleman
Frank J. Coleman
Henry Bergman
Henry Bergman
Kitty Bradbury and Edna Purviance
Kitty Bradbury and Edna Purviance
Tiny Sanford sees Kitty Bradbury
Tiny Sanford sees Kitty Bradbury
Tom Harrington
Tom Harrington
William Gillespie
William Gillespie