The Law of Contact

Sally of the Subway or The Case of the Black Pearl (January 15, 1932)

Sally of the Subway
 

Released on January 15, 1932: A European Grand Duke is out of money and a confidence girl and her henchmen involve him in a jewelry store scheme.

Produced by Ralph M. Like

Directed by George B. Seitz

The Actors: Jack Mulhall (Grand Duke Ludwig of Saxe-Thalberg), Dorothy Revier (Sarah Minx, aka Sally of the Subway), Blanche Mehaffey (Angela White), Huntley Gordon (Stanley M. Gordon), Harry Semels (Leopold Von Trump), Crauford Kent (Moffitt), John Webb Dillon (henchman McMillan), William P. Burt (henchman Scraggs), Julia Griffith (jewelry story receptionist), George 'Gabby' Hayes (Police Lieutenant Paxton), Bob Reeves (Police Officer Bill), Ellinor Vanderveer (Mrs. Stubbs)

 
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The Perfect Crime?

I've watched my share of crime adventures, and while I categorize this story as a crime adventure, I am not sure that a crime was committed that would land anyone in jail . . . . I am just not sure. I call out to legal professionals to advise me on this story, and I will then share that advice with all of you, giving credit to the expert that can give some guidance. I am aware that what may be a crime in one city, state or nation might not be a crime in another, but I think that there is probably some general legal wisdom on the matter. The story has much more to entertain us with than just the confidence-style caper, but the con itself is what puzzles me. A con-man and his pretty young assistant convince an out-of-money Grand Duke to be an agent for them with a jeweler. The con-man gives the Duke a huge black pearl and a thousand dollars and instructs him to ask a jeweler to find a match for the pearl at any cost. It turns out that the con-man purchased two matching pearls in the first place, so now he sets a henchman up as a jewelry wholesaler and offers to sell the matching pearl to the jewelry store that is looking for a match . . . . At a greatly inflated price. Here is the legal question: If I offer to sell you something that we both know is worth $5,000 – but I am asking $30,000 because you think you can then re-sell it for $40,000 . . . . Is any part of that sale illegal? There is a lot more plot around this transaction, but that is the con . . . . If you are interested, check this review in a couple of weeks and find out what a legal eagle thinks (I hope!) I would like to hear from a prosecutor, judge or other experienced criminal court professional. Until then, pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter drizzled over it and enjoy the show.

Blanche Mehaffey
Blanche Mehaffey
Blanche Mehaffey and Ellionr Vanderveer
Blanche Mehaffey and Ellionr Vanderveer
Blanche Mehaffey and Jack Mulhall
Blanche Mehaffey and Jack Mulhall
Blanche Mehaffey
Blanche Mehaffey
Crauford Kent
Crauford Kent
Crauford Kent and Julia Griffith
Crauford Kent and Julia Griffith
Crauford Kent
Crauford Kent
Dorothy Revier
Dorothy Revier
Dorothy Revier and Huntley Gordon
Dorothy Revier and Huntley Gordon
Dorothy Revier and Huntly Gordon
Dorothy Revier and Huntly Gordon
Dorothy Revier
Dorothy Revier
Ellinor Vanderveer
Ellinor Vanderveer
Harry Semels
Harry Semels
Harry Semels and Jack Mulhall
Harry Semels and Jack Mulhall
Harry Semels
Harry Semels
Huntley Gordon and Harry Semels
Huntley Gordon and Harry Semels
Huntley Gordon and Harry Semels
Huntley Gordon and Harry Semels
Huntley Gordon and Jack Mulhall
Huntley Gordon and Jack Mulhall
Huntley Gordon
Huntley Gordon
Jack Mulhall
Jack Mulhall
Jack Mulhall and Blanche Mehaffey
Jack Mulhall and Blanche Mehaffey
Jack Mulhall
Jack Mulhall
John Webb Dillon, Huntley Gordon and Jack Mulhall
John Webb Dillon, Huntley Gordon and Jack Mulhall
Julia Griffith, Gabby Hayes, Jack Mulhall and Bob Reeves
Julia Griffith, Gabby Hayes, Jack Mulhall and Bob Reeves
Julia Griffith and Blanche Mehaffey
Julia Griffith and Blanche Mehaffey