Pygmalion (October 6, 1938)

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Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller
 

Released October 6, 1938: Professor Henry Higgins, a confirmed bachelor, creates the perfect woman by teaching Eliza Doolittle, a poor London gutter snipe, to speak and act and look like a Princess.

Produced by Gabriel Pascal and Leslie Howard

Directed by Anthony Asquith and Leslie Howard

The Actors: Leslie Howard (Professor Henry Higgins), Wendy Hiller (Eliza Doolittle), Wilfrid Lawson (Alfred Doolittle), Marie Lohr (Mrs. Higgins), Scott Sunderland (Colonel George Pickering), Jean Cadell (Mrs. Pearce), David Tree (Freddy Eynsford-Hill), Everley Gregg (Mrs. Eynsford-Hill), Leueen MacGrath (Clara Eynsford Hill), Esme Percy (Count Aristid Karpathy), Violet Vanbrugh (Amassadress), Iris Hoey (Ysabel, social reporter), Viola Tree (Perfide, social reporter), Irene Browne (Duchess), Kate Cutler (Grand Old Lady), Cathleen Nesbitt (old lady), O.B. Clarence (Mr. Birchwood the Vicar), Wally Patch (first bystander), H.F. Maltby (second bystander), George Mozart (third bystander), Ivor Barnard (sarcastic bystander), Cecil Trouncer (first policeman), Stephen Murray (second policeman), Eileen Beldon (Mrs. Higgins' parlormaid), Frank Atkinson (taxi driver), Leo Genn (Prince), Moyna MacGill (woman bystander), Patrick Macnee (extra), Anthony Quayle (Eliza's hairdresser)

 

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Creating the Perfect Woman . . .

In 1912 George Bernard Shaw wrote a play about the Greek myth of Pygmalion. In the mythology of Greece, Pygmalion was a sculptor . . . a very fine sculptor that created a sculpture of the perfect woman. This statue was so beautiful and so very perfect that the man made a wish that his sculpture could become flesh and blood He had his wish granted, and then the story gets interesting. In 1938 Shaw and famous British actor Leslie Howard collaborated on turning his play into a modern movie. So was born one of the great classic love stories of all time, and for my money, this original version that George Bernard Shaw helped bring to life is worlds better than any of the movies and television re-makes of this amazing tale.

Hey guys - did you ever wish that you could create your own 'perfect' woman? . . . . Would you like to meet the man that did create the perfect woman? Professor Henry Higgins is a wealthy London happy-go-lucky, devil-may-care bachelor. When he and his friend meet a poor girl selling flowers in Piccadilly, his friend bets Higgins that he cannot turn the gutter tramp girl into a proper London lady. They take Elisa Doolittle, the very poor street urchin, and try to turn her into a 'lady' that they could introduce to England's finest and convince them that she was one of them. After weeks of arduous work, Higgins and his buddy Colonel Pickering escort the young lady to a grand ball for the elite of London, hoping that she has learned enough to fool everyone at the party. They succeed without a problem as everyone at the ball is convinced that gutter snipe Eliza is actually Hungarian royalty. The dirty young girl selling flowers in Piccadilly has become a lady thanks to crotchety bachelor Higgins. Then a strange thing happens . . . . the beautiful lady is tired of being the student of the outspoken bachelor and decides that she will turn her strong-willed professor into a husband . . . . Her husband . . . . Sure, Higgins can turn a gutter tramp into the perfect woman, but can the lady now turn round and make a proper husband out of Higgins? Pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter drizzled over it and enjoy the show.

Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller
Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller
Wendy Hiller
Wendy Hiller
Wendy Hiller at the grand ball
Wendy Hiller at the grand ball
David Tree and Stephen Murray
David Tree and Stephen Murray
David Tree and Wendy Hiller
David Tree and Wendy Hiller
David Tree
David Tree
Esme Percy and Kate Cutler
Esme Percy and Kate Cutler
Esme Percy and Leslie Howard
Esme Percy and Leslie Howard
Jean Cadell, Wilfrid Lawson and Leslie Howard
Jean Cadell, Wilfrid Lawson and Leslie Howard
Jean Cadell and Wilfrid Lawson
Jean Cadell and Wilfrid Lawson
Jean Cadell
Jean Cadell
Kate Cutler
Kate Cutler
Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller
Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller
Leslie Howard and Eileen Beldon
Leslie Howard and Eileen Beldon
Leslie Howard and Kate Cutler
Leslie Howard and Kate Cutler
Leslie Howard and Marie Lohr
Leslie Howard and Marie Lohr
Leslie Howard and Marie Lohr
Leslie Howard and Marie Lohr
Leslie Howard and Scott Sunderland
Leslie Howard and Scott Sunderland
Leslie Howard
Leslie Howard
Leslie Howard meets Wendy Hiller
Leslie Howard meets Wendy Hiller
Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller
Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller
Leslie Howard
Leslie Howard
Leueen MacGrath and Everley Gregg
Leueen MacGrath and Everley Gregg
Leueen MacGrath, Leslie Hoeard and Everley-Gregg
Leueen MacGrath, Leslie Hoeard and Everley-Gregg
Marie Lohr
Marie Lohr
Marie Lohr and Wilfrid Lawson
Marie Lohr and Wilfrid Lawson
Marie Lohr and Wendy Hiller
Marie Lohr and Wendy Hiller
Marie Lohr
Marie Lohr
O.B. Clarence
O.B. Clarence
Scott Sunderland and Leslie Howard
Scott Sunderland and Leslie Howard
Scott Sunderland and Leslie Howard
Scott Sunderland and Leslie Howard
Scott Sunderland and Wilfrid Lawson
Scott Sunderland and Wilfrid Lawson
Scott Sunderland
Scott Sunderland
Wendy Hiller and Everley Gregg
Wendy Hiller and Everley Gregg
Wendy Hiller and Scott Sunderland
Wendy Hiller and Scott Sunderland
Wendy Hiller and Scott Sunderland
Wendy Hiller and Scott Sunderland
Wendy Hiller and Wilfrid Lawson
Wendy Hiller and Wilfrid Lawson
Wendy Hiller at tea
Wendy Hiller at tea
Wendy Hiller
Wendy Hiller
Wendy Hiller
Wendy Hiller
Wendy Hiller
Wendy Hiller
Wilfrid Lawson
Wilfrid Lawson
Wilfrid Lawson
Wilfrid Lawson