Just My Luck (December 30, 1935)

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Just My Luck
 

Released on December 30, 1935: Rubber company secretary Homer Crow has invented synthetic rubber, but is fired before he can show it to the boss.

Directed by Ray Heinz

The Actors: Charles Ray (Homer Crow), Anne Grey (Harriet Wright), Edward J. Nugent (Vic Dunne), Quentin Smith (Erwin Wright), 'Snub' Pollard (Frank Smith), Lee Prather (J.B. Dunne), Matthew Betz (Doyle), Robert Graves (Voorhees), John Roche (R.H. Nelson), Lillian Elliott (Mrs. Riley, landlady), Paul Weigel (Graves), Henry Roquemore (banker Logan), Jerry Mandy (Nick, cafe owner), Charles King (henchman Lefty), Hal Price (policeman), Beth Marion (gold-digging moll), Tom London (plant manager), Richard Cramer (waiter at Nick's), Lionel Backus (employee), Frank Brownlee (worker in montage), Bobby Burns (restaurant customer), Jack Cheatham (worker), Dick Curtis (henchman), John Ince (Nelson associate), Charles McAvoy (cop at gate), Frank McCarroll (Frank, cook/bouncer at Nick's Cafe), Charles McMurphy (worker), Arthur Millett (board member and cop at gate), George Morrell (cafe bum), Frances Morris (reporter), Frank O'Connor (board member), Harry Strang (reporter Brenner), Al Thompson (worker in montage), Fred 'Snowflake' Toones (golf caddy)

 

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The Secret to Good Luck

Supposedly Samuel Goldwyn said, "The harder I work, the luckier I get," but I respectfully contend that this is not true. There is one incorrect word in that statement that if changed, makes the statement very true. I contend that the true and correct law of this universe is: The Smarter I work, the luckier I get. If you study the great inventors, business leaders and wealthy men of history you will quickly discover that none of them was the hardest worker . . . . the most persistent, yes . . . . the ones with the most faith, or confidence, or ego if you like, yes . . . . but never the hardest worker. Now about the 'smart' part . . . . I do not mean the most educated when I say 'smart,' but rather the one with the most vision or imagination. One of the 'smartest' men in the history of the world was without doubt Albert Einstein, and in 1929 he said, "Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited, whereas imagination embraces the entire world, stimulating progress, giving birth to evolution. It is, strictly speaking, a real factor in scientific research." In this movie there are two young wealthy men who have the finest education that money could buy, and they look great in a suit, but they are totally without imagination and business intuition. They run a rubber company building tires for autos, and they are about to be put out of business by Nelson, who controls the tight rubber supply. By contrast meek and mild tempered secretary Homer Crow, played by Charles Ray, has one heckuva imagination. He imagines that the pretty sister of one of the young company owners is going to marry him, and he has also experimented and created a synthetic rubber product. In 1935, when automobiles were becoming very popular, and every one of them needed tires made from rubber that was very difficult and expensive to get, Homer Crow experimented and discovered synthetic rubber. But his bosses at the company didn't pay much attention to him and he is unjustly fired from his job. DuPont had created a synthetic rubber in 1931, but it hadn't come to market yet, and it wasn't until 1941 that a B.F. Goodrich scientist discovered an inexpensive replacement for rubber, just as World War II was ramping up and swallowing all of the available rubber supplies . . . . . but I digress. Our hero, Homer Crow, is without a job even though he has discovered the product that the whole world is waiting for. On his way out of his job he listens to his secret sweetheart telling reporters the qualities that she wants in her future husband, and he makes a list of those qualities, determined to become her perfect man. But he has been fired, and soon loses his apartment and walks the streets as a homeless man along with another fellow. But even though Homer Crow has lost his job, and is at what anyone would call the very bottom of life's ladder, he still has his imagination and faith. Along with his homeless buddy Frank Smith, played by 'Snub' Pollard, he uses his imagination and good sense to get real lucky. We can guess that by the end he will be on top of the world, with the girl of his dreams and with his synthetic rubber changing the world, but despite knowing the ending, you will enjoy Homer's journey from tramp to trump. Pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn and drizzle plenty of real melted butter on it and enjoy the show.

Anne Grey chases Charles Ray
Anne Grey chases Charles Ray
Anne Grey is about to kiss Charles Ray
Anne Grey is about to kiss Charles Ray
Anne Grey is Harriet Wright in Just My Luck
Anne Grey is Harriet Wright in Just My Luck
Anne Grey in Just My Luck, 1935
Anne Grey in the 1935 motion picture Just My Luck
Charles King and Paul Wiegel in Just My Luck
Charles King and Paul Wiegel in Just My Luck
Charles Ray and Edward J. Nugent
Charles Ray and Edward J. Nugent
Forrest Taylor and Patsy Kelly
Charles Ray and Lionel Backus
Charles Ray as Homer Crow in Just My Luck
Charles Ray as Homer Crow in Just My Luck
Charles Ray, 1935
Charles Ray, 1935
Charles Ray listenes as Anne Grey tells reporters what she is looking for in her ideal man
Charles Ray listenes as Anne Grey tells reporters what she is looking for in her ideal man
Edward J. Nugent and Anne Grey
Edward J. Nugent and Anne Grey
Edward J. Nugent and Lee Prather
Edward J. Nugent and Lee Prather
Edward J. Nugent as Vic Dunne in Just My Luck
Edward J. Nugent as Vic Dunne in Just My Luck
Hal Price and Snub Pollard in Just My Luck
Hal Price and Snub Pollard in Just My Luck
Henry Roquemore and Charles Ray
Henry Roquemore and Charles Ray
John Roche and Robert Graves
John Roche and Robert Graves
John Roche as R.H. Nelson in Just My Luck
John Roche as R.H. Nelson in Just My Luck
Lee Prather as J.B. Dunne, owner of the rubber company
Lee Prather as J.B. Dunne, owner of the rubber company
Lillian Elliott kicks Charles Ray out of his apartment
Lillian Elliott kicks Charles Ray out of his apartment
Paul Weigel in Just My Luck
Paul Weigel in Just My Luck
Quentin Smith as Erwin Wright in Just My Luck
Quentin Smith as Erwin Wright in Just My Luck
Richard Cramer and Bobby Burns in Just My Luck
Richard Cramer and Bobby Burns in Just My Luck
Richard Cramer and Frank McCarroll
Richard Cramer and Frank McCarroll
Richard Cramer bites a silver dollar to see if it is real
Richard Cramer bites a silver dollar to see if it is real
Snub Pollard and Charles Ray in the steak house without any money
Snub Pollard and Charles Ray in the steak house without any money
Snub Pollard as Frank Smith, homeless partner of Charles Ray
Snub Pollard as Frank Smith, homeless partner of Charles Ray
Snub Pollard at Nick's steak house, eating his dinner
Snub Pollard at Nick's steak house, eating his dinner