I'll Be Your Sweetheart (July 30, 1945)

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I'll Be Your Sweetheart
 

Released on July 30, 1945: Two fellows in 1890's London start printing sheet music for 6 pennies and put the older publishers out of business, but then a black market publisher sells their music for 2 pennies, and they must fight to preserve their business model.

Produced by Louis Levy

Directed by Val Guest

The Actors: Margaret Lockwood (Edie Story), Vic Oliver (Sam Kahn), Michael Rennie (Bob Fielding), Peter (George Wellesley) Graves (Jim Knight), Moore Marriott (George Le Brunn), Frederick Burtwell (Pacey, music shop owner), Garry Marsh (Wallace), George Merritt (T.P. O'Connor), Muriel George (Mrs. Le Brunn), Ella Retford (Dresser), Alf Goddard (second henchman), Eliot Makeham (John Friar), Maudie Edwards (Mrs. Jones), Jonathan Field (Matt Kelly), Barry Lupino (unknown), Dave Crowley (first henchman), Joss Ambler (Dugan), Wendy Toye (unknown), Deryck Guyler (politician), Gordon McLeod (Prime Minister), Arthur Mullard (unknown), Jack Vyvian (third henchman), Arthur Young (judge)

 

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Sheet Music Thugs

Papa was a preacher, but I soon discovered that preaching the Gospel was not the passion that would wake me early every day and keep me working while others were sleeping. On the journey searching for my passion I tried a couple dozen jobs and professions, and discovered along the way that I had a talent for managing restaurants . . . . Or should I say I had a modicum of skill managing the people that helped feed the hungry folk of the area. In any case, I say that to tell you about a friend who owns a company that sells restaurants everything from salt and pepper shakers to kitchen equipment. His business has been declining for years because local independent restaurants have been disappearing for years. Large chain restaurants have taken over . . . . From the most inexpensive 'fast' foods to the most expensive steak houses, large chains have arrived. They serve carefully measured quantities made by carefully created recipes using food and equipment purchased in large quantities for the entire chain and delivered by the chain's trucks and employees . . . . While my friend sells less and less to the few independent restaurants left. The business of selling food to consumers is evolving, and yesterday's smashingly profitable business may not be tomorrow's thriving business. The only constant in our world is change . . . . Buggy whip manufacturers are not out of business because there is no more leather to make whips . . . . Automobile muffler shops are not out of business because autos no longer have mufflers . . . . Neighborhood butcher shops did not disappear because people stopped eating meat . . . . 78rpm records have not disappeared because people no longer listen to music . . . Our world changes and evolves every moment, and one can either fight to keep yesterday's world, or discover the way to meet the needs of tomorrow's consumer. This movie is about publishers of sheet music with words and tunes of new and popular songs in the 1890's . . . . Publishers selling pieces of paper with the notes and words of the songwriters. The publishers were selling songs at a very profitable price and sharing that profit with the author of the song. A couple of young fellows decide to become music publishers and sell their sheet music for 6 pennies each . . . . much less than the publishers of the day, and they take over the market and put the older publishers out of business because of their much cheaper prices. Then they are almost put out of business by black market sheet music printers selling for only 2 pennies each, and they must convince Parliament to extend copyright protection to popular sheet music to preserve their 6 penny business model. Along the way the two '6 penny publishers' will battle each other for the love of the same girl, and gather thugs to fight the '2 penny publishers'. In my opinion protecting the intellectual property of the creators of such is vital to keep the creative juices flowing. The line deciding exactly what is protected and for how long will always be a debatable give-and-take, like most things in life. While I agree with the need in the late 1800's for extending legal protection to sheet music, it is sad, in my humble opinion, that the people in the story focused more on crushing competition instead of out-witting it. Pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter drizzled over it and enjoy the show.

Arthur Young
Arthur Young
Eliot Makeham and Moore Marriott
Eliot Makeham and Moore Marriott
Frederick Burtwell
Frederick Burtwell
Fredierick Burtwell and Michael Rennie
Fredierick Burtwell and Michael Rennie
Frederick Burtwell
Frederick Burtwell
Garry Marsh
Garry Marsh
George Merritt
George Merritt
Jonathan Field and Peter Graves
Jonathan Field and Peter Graves
Jonathan Field
Jonathan Field
Margaret Lockwood
Margaret Lockwood
Margaret Lockwood and Peter Graves
Margaret Lockwood and Peter Graves
Margaret Lockwood and Vic Oliver
Margaret Lockwood and Vic Oliver
Margaret Lockwood and Peter Graves
Margaret Lockwood and Peter Graves
Margaret Lockwood
Margaret Lockwood
Maudie Edwards and Michael Rennie
Maudie Edwards and Michael Rennie
Michael Rennie
Michael Rennie
Michael Rennie and Margaret Lockwood
Michael Rennie and Margaret Lockwood
Michael Rennie and Moore Marriott
Michael Rennie and Moore Marriott
Michael Rennie
Michael Rennie
Margaret Lockwood and Michael Rennie
Margaret Lockwood and Michael Rennie
Michael Rennie
Michael Rennie
Moore Marriott and Eliot Makeham
Moore Marriott and Eliot Makeham
Moore Marriott and Michael Rennie
Moore Marriott and Michael Rennie
Moore Marriott
Moore Marriott
Muriel George
Muriel George
Peter Graves
Peter Graves
Peter Graves
Peter Graves
Vic Oliver
Vic Oliver