The Blind Goddess (September 9, 1948)

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The Blind Goddess
 

Released on September 9, 1948: A former employee of the eminent Lord Arthur Brasted accuses his boss of skimming huge sums of money from the government funds that he is in charge of.

Produced by Sydney Box

Directed by Harold French

The Actors: Eric Portman (Sir John Dearing KC, Brasted's soliciter/lawyer), Anne Crawford (Lady Helen Brasted), Hugh Williams (Lord Arthur Brasted), Michael Denison (Derek Waterhouse), Claire Bloom (Mary Dearing), Nora Swinburne (Lady Dearing), Raymond Lovell (Frank Mainwaring KC, Derek's solicitor/lawyer), Frank Cellier (the judge), Clive Morton (Mersel), Maurice Denham (Johnson), Cecil Bevan (Morton), Elspet Gray (Daphne Dearing), Martin Benson (Count Stephan Mikla), Carroll Gibbons (himself, orchestra leader), Grace Allardyce (first jury woman), Wallace Bosco (newspaper seller), Cyril Chamberlain (policeman in park), Geoffrey Denton (jury foreman), Thora Hird (Derek's charwoman), Noel Howlett (court usher), Joan Ingram (second jury woman), Carl Jaffe (Johan Meyer, Mikla's valet), Martin Miller (Mario, waiter at the Savoy), Marcel Poncin (Bertoni), Philip Saville (Mainwaring's junior), John Stone (Sir John's Junior), Rosemary Treston (Helen)

 

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Is Justice Really 'Blind'?

Blind Justice, and The Blind Goddess, is a reference to the fact that an impartial court should be just as willing to find a pauper innocent or guilty as the leading citizen of the town. The American justice system got this principle from their British roots, and this drama is a British story of justice that should be blind, but maybe isn't indeed as blind as it should be. Position and influence should have no influence on truth and justice . . . . ahhh . . . But here is the rub . . . . Truth can be perceived in very different ways . . . . The most respected man in town has a private conversation with one of his employees and the employee is let go . . . The employee claims that he discovered that his boss, the great man of the town, has skimmed great sums of money from the government funds he is in charge of . . . and the great man says that his employee tried to blackmail him for a huge sum of money to pay off gambling debts . . . Which man is telling the truth, and which man is lying? Will the town, will the court, will the jury, be more likely to believe the account of the leading citizen who is doing important work for the government, or the former employee? How many times do we see 'disgruntled former employees' try to take vengeance on their boss by lying about the great man's words and deeds? No great man who is doing important work for the community and indeed for the entire nation should be accused of such treachery . . . . But what if . . . . What if the great man in the service of his nation is indeed a skunk . . . Now there isn't a person alive who has ever seen this great man do anything wrong or unkind, and there is no one in the world who would ever believe that the great man is anything but honest. When the disgruntled employee writes to the Prime Minister claiming that the great man has done wrong, the great man must hire the best solicitor in the nation to defend him, and the great man has the resources to manipulate the evidence presented so that the whole world will believe that the disgruntled former employee is lying . . . . And make no mistake, the evidence is mostly truthful evidence that is twisted in such a way as to make the great man appear honest and the former employee appear to be lying and spiteful . . . Even as I watched the battle, knowing that the young man was honest and that the great man had skeletons in his closet, I was almost convinced that the young man certainly must be wrong . . . . Wow . . . . Can an innocent man really be convicted in a court where justice is blind to position and money? You answer to that will depend greatly on your exposure to and experience with the justice system . . . Pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter drizzled over it and enjoy the show.

Anne Crawford
Anne Crawford
Anne Crawford and Michael Denison
Anne Crawford and Michael Denison
Anne Crawford
Anne Crawford
Anne Crawford
Anne Crawford
Carl Jaffe
Carl Jaffe
Carl Jaffe
Carl Jaffe
Carl Jaffe
Carl Jaffe
Claire Bloom
Claire Bloom
Claire Bloom and Elspet Gray
Claire Bloom and Elspet Gray
Claire Bloom and Eric Portman
Claire Bloom and Eric Portman
Claire Bloom
Claire Bloom
Clive Morton
Clive Morton
Elspet Gray
Elspet Gray
Eric Portman
Eric Portman
Eric Portman and Clive Morton
Eric Portman and Clive Morton
Eric Portman and Raymond Lovell
Eric Portman and Raymond Lovell
Eric Portman as Sir John Dearing
Eric Portman as Sir John Dearing
Eric Portman
Eric Portman
Frank Cellier
Frank Cellier
Hugh Williams and Anne Crawford
Hugh Williams and Anne Crawford
Hugh Williams and Clive Morton
Hugh Williams and Clive Morton
Hugh Williams and Maurice Denham
Hugh Williams and Maurice Denham
Hugh Williams and Michael Denison
Hugh Williams and Michael Denison
Hugh Williams
Hugh Williams
Martin Benson
Martin Benson
Martin Miller and Eric Portman
Martin Miller and Eric Portman
Maurice Denham
Maurice Denham
Michael Denison
Michael Denison
Michael Denison and Claire Bloom
Michael Denison and Claire Bloom
Michael Denison and Eric Portman
Michael Denison and Eric Portman
Michael Denison
Michael Denison
Nora Swinburne and Cecil Bevan
Nora Swinburne and Cecil Bevan
Raymond Lovell
Raymond Lovell
Thora Hird
Thora Hird