The Law of Contact

Smoky Mountain Melody (December 16, 1948)

Smoky Mountain Melody
 

Released on December 16, 1948: (running time 61 minutes) Roy Acuff takes control of a Tennessee ranch run by two feuding brothers.

Produced by Colbert Clark

Directed by Ray Nazarro

The Actors: Roy Acuff (Roy Acuff), Guinn 'Big Boy' Williams (Saddle Grease Williams, Corby County Sheriff), Russell Arms (Bruce 'Kid' Corby), Sybil Merritt (Mary Files), Tommy Ivo (Tommy Durkin), Jason Robards Sr. (Job Corby), Harry Cheshire (Doc Moffitt), Fred F. Sears (Mr. Crump, family attorney), Trevor Bardette (Uncle McCorkle), Tommy Magness (Tennessee's champion hoe-down fiddler, member of Roy Acuff's Smoky Mountain Boys), Jock Mahoney (Buckeye, ranch hand), Lonnie Wilson (country music singer and drummer, member of Roy Acuff's Smoky Mountain Boys), John Elliott (Englesby, Corby servant), Ralph Littlefield (Masters, school bus driver), Sam Flint (Brandon, State Attorney General), Eddie Acuff (Jenkins), Jack Ellis (Jones), Heinie Conklin (Bo, hobo tramp), Olin Howland (Lum Peters, neighboring rancher), Pete Kirby (known as Bashful Brother Oswald, guitar and dobro player for Roy Acuff's Smoky Mountain Boys), Jimmy Riddle (multi-instrument player, member of Roy Acuff's Smoky Mountain Boys, remebered for his appearances on the television show 'Hee Haw'), Joe Zinkan (country music bass player, member of Roy Acuff's Smoky Mountain Boys), Carolina Cotton (Perky Durkin)

 

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Long Live the King of Country Music, and Boo to Mr. Crump

Roy Acuff’s father was the postmaster and pastor of the Baptist church in rural Maynardvile, Tennessee. Even though Roy grew up around music, he liked sports better, and was on the way to a promising baseball career when he suffered several sun strokes, and eventually returned to his musical roots.

Radio personality George Hay began a new radio program on radio station WSM in Nashville, Tennessee, and called it the ‘WSM Barn Dance,’ which later became known as the ‘Grand Ole Opry.’ He wanted to feature an hour or two of old-time music every Saturday night. In 1937 he offered a contract to a group of musicians who called themselves the Smoky Mountain Boys, featuring lead singer Roy Acuff.

He became so popular that in 1942 Roy Acuff earned almost three times more money than the President of the United States. Roy and his friend Fred Rose started a music publishing company that would discover and represent legendary Country singers like Hank Williams and Patti Page. His publishing company would quickly become the most important company for country music in the world.

On March 16, 1974, when the Grand Ole Opry moved from Ryman Auditorium to it’s new home at the Grand Ole Opry House at Opryland, Tennessee, the first show opened with a giant image of Roy Acuff and the Smoky Mountain Boys, with the recorded voice of Opry founder George Hay introducing the band.

In the 1980’s, after the death of his wife, Roy Acuff lived his remaining days in a house on the Opryland grounds, continuing to perform occasionally at the Grand Ole Opry shows. During the week he did odd jobs around the place, even filling the backstage refrigerators with bottles of soda pop as needed. In 1991 he became the first Country music performer to receive the National Medal of Arts at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

Early in 1948, before filming this adventure, Roy Acuff invited Tennessee Governor Prentice Cooper to be the guest of honor at a gala celebrating a nationwide premier of the Grand Ole Opry. Democratic Governor Cooper declined, calling Roy Acuff disgraceful for taking the Grand Ole Opry nationwide. He said that Acuff would be making Tennessee the ‘hillbilly capital of the United States,’ and that would be a terrible thing.

Roy Acuff was so incensed that he decided to run for Governor of Tennessee as a Republican, determined to bring down the Democratic party headed by E.H. Crump. The bad guy in this 1948 movie starring Roy Acuff is called Mr. Crump, a deceitful lawyer. Pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn drizzled with plenty of warm melted butter and enjoy the show.

Guinn Williams, Carolina Cotton
Guinn Williams, Carolina Cotton
Carolina Cotton
Carolina Cotton
Eddie Acuff, Olin Howland
Eddie Acuff, Olin Howland
Fred F. Sears, Jason Robards Sr.
Fred F. Sears, Jason Robards Sr.
Guinn 'Big Boy' Williams, Carolina Cotton, and Tommy
Guinn 'Big Boy' Williams, Carolina Cotton, and Tommy
Guinn Williams, Carolina Cotton
Guinn Williams, Carolina Cotton
Harry Cheshire
Harry Cheshire
Harry Cheshire, Heinie Conklin
Harry Cheshire, Heinie Conklin
Harry Cheshire, Russell Arms
Harry Cheshire, Russell Arms
Harry Cheshire
Harry Cheshire
Jason Robards Sr., Guinn Williams, Roy Acuff
Jason Robards Sr., Guinn Williams, Roy Acuff
Jimmy Riddle, Pete Kirk, Roy Acuff
Jimmy Riddle, Pete Kirk, Roy Acuff
Jimmy Riddle, Roy Acuff, Tommy Magness
Jimmy Riddle, Roy Acuff, Tommy Magness
Jimmy Riddle, Roy Acuff
Jimmy Riddle, Roy Acuff
John Elliott, Russell Arms
John Elliott, Russell Arms
Roy Acuff
Roy Acuff
Roy Acuff
Roy Acuff
Roy Acuff
Roy Acuff
Russell Arms
Russell Arms
Russell Arms, Sybil Merritt
Russell Arms, Sybil Merritt
Sybil Merritt
Sybil Merritt
Sybil Merritt, Roy Acuff, Jason Robards Sr.
Sybil Merritt, Roy Acuff, Jason Robards Sr.
Tommy Magness, Roy Acuff
Tommy Magness, Roy Acuff
Tommy
Tommy
Trevor Bardette
Trevor Bardette
Trevor Bardette, Jason Robards Sr.
Trevor Bardette, Jason Robards Sr.