Santa Fé Marshal (January 26, 1940)

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Marjorie Rambeau and William Boyd
 

Released on January 26, 1940: Santa Fé Marshal Hopalong Cassidy goes undercover as a traveling medicine show mind reader to discover who the ringleader of a small town band of outlaws is.

Produced by Harry Sherman

Directed by Lesley Selander

The Actors: William Boyd (Hopalong Cassidy), Russell Hayden (Lucky Jenkins), Marjorie Rambeau (Ma Burton), Bernadene Hayes (Paula Tate), Earle Hodgins (Doc Rufus Tate), Britt Wood (Axel), Kenneth Harlan (Blake), William Pagan (Flint), George Anderson (Tex Barnes), Jack Rockwell (John Gardner), Eddie Dean (Marshal Thorpe), Horace B. Carpenter (Sam), Jim Corey (townsman), Rube Dalroy (medicine show spectator), Frank Ellis (medicine show spectator), Duke Green (brawler and member of Tex's gang), Billy Jones (member of Tex's gang), Merrill McCormick (card player), Mathew McCue (medicine show spectator), Robert McKenzie (townsman), Jack Montgomery (medicine show spectator), Matt Moore (watchman), George Morrell (townsman wearing glasses), Cliff Parkinson (member of Tex's gang), Lee Phelps (blacksmith), George Sowards (medicine show spectator), Billy Wilkerson (indian)

 

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Hoppy & The Indian Medicine Show

In the mid 1850’s a young fellow named Andy Carnegie was working for the Pennsylvania Railroad in Altoona and Pittsburgh Pennsylvania. When a railroad bridge made of large wooden beams burned down Andy got the idea that the railroad should start building railroad bridges out of iron instead of wood. With a couple of friends, he purchased a small iron making outfit in Pittsburgh and began building iron railroad bridges for the railroad. Andrew Carnegie wrote about those days, and one of the stories he wrote about was the first oil well.

During those days in Pittsburgh there were native American Indians who would sell small bottles of magic healing oil that the Indians claimed could cure many diseases. The Indians found this magic oil a few miles north of Pittsburgh floating on a creek, and they scooped this magic oil into little bottles and sold it as an Indian medicine cure.

This was before electricity and electric lights, and homes were lit at night by lamps filled with whale oil. A couple of fellows in Pittsburgh discovered that this Indian oil would burn in the whale oil lamps and they started a company to find what they called ‘rock oil’ to replace the expensive whale oil. They sent Edwin Drake north to the place where oil was so abundant that it floated on the water of a local creek and he drilled the first well designed to pump oil instead of water near Titusville, and the search for crude oil was born.

By the way, this was about the time that over in Cleveland, Ohio a young man got interested in this new rock oil that could replace whale oil, and young John Rockefeller built a small oil refinery in the flats of Cleveland near a river that would a hundred years later famously catch fire from the floating pollution from nearby factories.

In this adventure Hopalong Cassidy is a U.S. Marshal who has gone undercover as a mind reader with a traveling medicine show huckster who sells a magic Indian potion. Earle Hodgins is Doc Rufus Tate, who is selling a wondrous Indian miracle potion made of horse-trough water, a bit of tea for coloring and a bit of bitter herb to make it taste like medicine.

Earle Hodgins became famous for playing the part of a carnival barker in movies and television shows, and the scene where he performs his medicine show speech is a classic example of his comic genius. He doesn’t use his most famous line in this example, but he later became famous for always having a young boy interrupt his speech, and he would tell the young boy to ‘go away, boy, you bother me.’

There is an outlaw with a gang of thieves in this story of course, but this time the outlaw leader is sweet, old Ma Burton. The fights and shooting are a bit milder than in most Hopalong Cassidy adventures, and we will hear William Boyd’s famous laugh more times than usual, but the adventure is as captivating as ever. Pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter drizzled over it and enjoy the show.

Bernadene Hayes and Earle Hodgins
Bernadene Hayes and Earle Hodgins
Bernadene Hayes and Marjorie Rambeau
Bernadene Hayes and Marjorie Rambeau
Bernadene Hayes and William Boyd
Bernadene Hayes and William Boyd
Bernadene Hayes
Bernadene Hayes
Bill Boyd, George Anderson and Russell Hayden
Bill Boyd, George Anderson and Russell Hayden
William Boyd
William Boyd
Britt Wood, Bernadene Hayes and Earle Hodgins
Britt Wood, Bernadene Hayes and Earle Hodgins
Earle Hodgins and Britt Wood
Earle Hodgins and Britt Wood
Earle Hodgins and George Anderson
Earle Hodgins and George Anderson
George Anderson and Russell Hayden
George Anderson and Russell Hayden
George Anderson and William Pagan
George Anderson and William Pagan
Horace B. Carpenter and Marjorie Rambeau
Horace B. Carpenter and Marjorie Rambeau
Jack Rockwell, Marjorie Rambeau and Eddie Dean
Jack Rockwell, Marjorie Rambeau and Eddie Dean
Kenneth Harlan
Kenneth Harlan
Lee Phelps
Lee Phelps
Marjorie Rambeau
Marjorie Rambeau
Marjorie Rambeau and Bernadene Hayes
Marjorie Rambeau and Bernadene Hayes
Marjorie Rambeau and Eddie Dean
Marjorie Rambeau and Eddie Dean
Marjorie Rambeau, Kenneth Harlan and William Boyd
Marjorie Rambeau, Kenneth Harlan and William Boyd
Marjorie Rambeau and William Boyd
Marjorie Rambeau and William Boyd
Marjorie Rambeau
Marjorie Rambeau
Russell Hayden and Bernadene Hayes
Russell Hayden and Bernadene Hayes
Russell Hayden
Russell Hayden
William Boyd
William Boyd
William Boyd and Jack Rockwell
William Boyd and Jack Rockwell
William Boyd and Marjorie Rambeau
William Boyd and Marjorie Rambeau
William Boyd
William Boyd
William Pagan, Marjorie Rambeau and Kenneth Harlan
William Pagan, Marjorie Rambeau and Kenneth Harlan
William Pagan
William Pagan