The Law of Contact

Hold That Woman (June 28, 1940)

Frances Gifford, James Dunn
 

Released on June 28, 1940: (running time 64 minutes) A skip-tracer tries to take back a radio that a lady didn't finish paying for, but crooks have hidden stolen diamonds inside the radio, and the chase is on in this romantic comedy crime adventure.

Directed by Sigmund Neufeld

Directed by Sam Newfield

The Actors: James Dunn (Jimmy Parker, Skip-Tracer), Frances Gifford (Mary Mulvaney), George Douglas (Steve Brady, jewel thief), Rita La Roy (Lulu Driscoll, Steve Brady's girlfriend), Martin Spellman (Mike Mulvaney), Eddie Fetherston (Conroy), Guy Usher (Police Officer John Mulvaney), Paul Bryar ('Duke' Jurgens), Edwin Max (henchman 'Taxi'), John Dilson (Bill Lannigan), Dave O'Brien (Miles Hanover), Anna Lisa (Corrine Hill, movie star), William Hall (John Lawrence, Corrine's business manager), Marie Rice (Mrs. John Mulvaney), Frank Meredith (Police Officer Mike), Art Miles (Kayo), William Newell (bit part), Al Ferguson (policeman), Bruce Mitchell (policeman), Rebel Randall (apartment house telephone operator), Jack Roper (hood), Herb Vigran (furniture company repossessor), Crane Whitley (defense attorney)

 

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A Dollar Down and a Dollar a Week for a Portable Radio

Sometime during the Great Depression our country evolved from a ‘cash only’ society to a credit society. Instead of saving for a new radio or living room chair and then buying it with the saved cash, merchants desperate for a sale would offer their products for a small down payment followed by weekly installment payments until the merchandise was paid off.

The growth of installment payments led to many people who could not or would not finish paying for what they purchased. This led to the creation of ‘skip-tracers,’ men who would hunt for the people who stopped making their payments and either recover the merchandise or the rest of the money owed on the merchandise.

James Dunn plays the part of Jimmy Parker, who isn’t' a very good skip-tracer. He tries unsuccessfully to repossess a radio that a lady stopped making payments on, and he winds up in jail with his girlfriend, played by Frances Gifford, James Dunn’s real-life wife at the time.

It turns out that a crook has robbed a movie star of her jewels, and hidden them in the radio that was purchased on credit and not yet paid for. Jimmy doesn’t know this, but his search for the radio will lead him down a perilous and humorous path to capturing a gang of notorious jewel thieves.

This crime drama rolls right up to the romantic and comic finish in fine style, with a wonderful look at 1940 cars, clothing styles and dialogue. Pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter drizzled over it and enjoy the show.

Art Miles, Paul Bryar, Edwin Max
Art Miles, Paul Bryar, Edwin Max
Anna Lisa
Anna Lisa
Anna Lisa, William Hall
Anna Lisa, William Hall
Dave O'Brien
Dave O'Brien
Dave O'Brien
Dave O'Brien
Dave O'Brien
Dave O'Brien
Eddie Fetherston
Eddie Fetherston
Eddie Fetherston
Eddie Fetherston
Edwin Max, Art Miles
Edwin Max, Art Miles
Edwin Max, Paul Bryar
Edwin Max, Paul Bryar
Frances Gifford
Frances Gifford
Frank Meredith, James Dunn
Frank Meredith, James Dunn
George Douglas
George Douglas
George Douglas
George Douglas
George Douglas
George Douglas
Guy Usher
Guy Usher
Guy Usher
Guy Usher
Herb Vigran
Herb Vigran
James Dunn
James Dunn
James Dunn
James Dunn
John Dilson
John Dilson
John Dilson
John Dilson
Marie Rice, Guy Usher
Marie Rice, Guy Usher
Paul Bryar
Paul Bryar
Paul Bryar
Paul Bryar
Rebel Randall
Rebel Randall
Rebel Randall
Rebel Randall
Rebel Randall
Rebel Randall
Rita La Roy
Rita La Roy
Rita La Roy, Anna Lisa
Rita La Roy, Anna Lisa