You're Telling Me (May 3, 1942)

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The Ritz Brothers
 

Released on May 3, 1942: A nit-wit nephew gets a job with a big radio advertising company and must convince a famous jungle explorer returning from an expedition to sign a big radio contract, but the love lives of the explorer and his expedition partner get in the way.

Produced by Ken Goldsmith

Directed by Charles Lamont

The Actors: Hugh Herbert (Hubert Abercrombie Gumm), Anne Gwynne (Kit Bellamy), Robert Paige (Doctor Burnside 'Burnsy' Walker), Edward Ashley (Fred Curtis), Ernest Truex (Charles 'C.J.' Handley), Esther Dale (Aunt Fannnie Handley), Eily Malyon (Mrs. Appleby), Charles Smith (Bill, mimeograph operator), Helen Lynd (Miss Ames, scatterbrain secretary), Romaine Callender (J.T. Dorsett), Boyd Davis (Driscoll), Vickie Lester (Mrs. Adalaide Parks), Linda Brent (Leili), Kathryn Adams (girl), Jessie Arnold (unknown), Wilson Benge (butler), Ralph Brooks (unknown), Fritzi Brunette (unknown), Vera Brunette (unknown), Eddy Chandler (policeman), Heinie Conklin (scooter owner), Jane Cowan (freckle faced kid), Kernan Cripps (unknown), Ralph Dunn (doorman), Jack Gardner (reporter), William Haade (doorman), Harry Hayden (judge), Vinton Hayworth (announcer), Riley Hill (reporter), Olaf Hytten (Fielding, personnell manager), Emmett Lynn (scientist), Gertrude Mack (unknown), Wilbur Mack (gallant reporter), Patricia Maier (girl reporter), Marie McDonald (unknown), Charles McMurphy (policeman), Susan Miller (unknown), Frank O'Connor (policeman), Nell O'Day (unknown), Gene O'Donnell (reporter), Charles Sherlock (unknown), Grace Stafford (switchboard operator), Charles Sullivan (cop), Phil Tead (chauffeur), Janet Warren (unknown), Jan Wiley (girl radio announcer)

 

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Too Funny, Too Fast

It is my current custom to wake up each weekday morning at about 2:30am and drive from nearly rural Niles, Ohio to an outer-ring suburb of Cleveland where my day job office is located, and from about 4am until I start my day job at 8am, work in complete silence and solitude on adding movies, television shows and radio programs to my web sites. My first joy of each day is to watch and add a movie . . . I multi-task during the movie and while it is playing in a corner of my computer screen I am also creating the code and text for the movie web page. While watching the show I am adding the names of the producer, director, authors and actors to the page. Once the names of the participants are added to the web page I begin linking each person with their entry on the actors' pages, adding the new movie to their list of credits . . . All the while watching and enjoying the movie and starting to think about what to say in my review . . . oh . . . I am also watching for good photo shots of the actors and when I spot what I think would make a good photo I will stop the movie, rewind, re-watch and pause at the optimum frame and grab a screen shot of the actors. For almost every movie that I add, I can complete all of the 'extra' work on the movie before the end of the story, but for this movie I horribly failed . . . The movie was over, the story was all wrapped up . . . and I wasn't even half finished linking the known actors to their actors page entry and adding this movie to their credits . . . What the heck went wrong? Where did the time fly to? The story line in this cornball comedy isn't particularly unique, and is relatively predictable, but the confusing situations and the resulting belly-laughs came at me so fast and so funny that I must have been too engrossed in the story to work in a timely manner on the actors credits . . . Sheesh . . . I don't remember this ever happening before today . . . why . . . . I've watched one-reel, ten minute comedies that lasted longer than this 60 minute story, if you know what I mean. I have decided to not tell you a thing about the story line, as it will probably take me longer to explain it to you than it will take you to enjoy it. So, pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter on it and enjoy the show!

P.S. ~ Fan Jeff Missinne tells me that telephone operator Grace Stafford, previously married to cowboy actor Tom Keene, had just married cartoonist Walter Lantz and would soon go on to fame as the voice of Woody the Woodpecker.

Anne Gwynne in 1942
Anne Gwynne in 1942
Anne Gwynne and Edward Ashley
Anne Gwynne and Edward Ashley
Anne Gwynne and Eily Malyon
Anne Gwynne and Eily Malyon
Anne Gwynne and Hugh Herbert
Anne Gwynne and Hugh Herbert
Anne Gwynne and Robert Paige
Anne Gwynne and Robert Paige
Anne Gwynne plots with Edward Ashley
Anne Gwynne plots with Edward Ashley
Anne Gwynne
Anne Gwynne
Bob Davis and Olaf Hytten
Bob Davis and Olaf Hytten
Charles Smith and Hugh Herbert
Charles Smith and Hugh Herbert
Edward Ashley
Edward Ashley
Edward Ashley and Robert Paige
Edward Ashley and Robert Paige
Edward Ashley kisses Anne Gwynne on the cheek
Edward Ashley kisses Anne Gwynne on the cheek
Eily Malyon
Eily Malyon
Ernest Truex
Ernest Truex
Ernest Truex and Boyd Davis
Ernest Truex and Boyd Davis
Ernest Truex and Hugh Herbert
Ernest Truex and Hugh Herbert
Ernest Truex
Ernest Truex
Esther Dale
Esther Dale
Esther Dale and Robert Paige
Esther Dale and Robert Paige
Grace Stafford
Grace Stafford
Helen Lynd
Helen Lynd
Helen Lynd
Helen Lynd
Hugh Herbert and Esther Dale
Hugh Herbert and Esther Dale
Linda Brent kisses Robert Paige
Linda Brent kisses Robert Paige
Linda Brent meets Anne Gwynne
Linda Brent meets Anne Gwynne
Robert Paige, Linda Brent, Hugh Herbert and Anne Gwynne
Robert Paige, Linda Brent, Hugh Herbert and Anne Gwynne
Romaine Callendar
Romaine Callendar