Billy the Kid's Gun Justice (December 27, 1940)

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Bob Steele and Fuzzy Al St. John
 

Released on December 27, 1940: Billy the Kid and his pals escape a Sheriff's posse and while hiding out in a new town discover that a town businessman is selling ranches he doesn't own to unsuspecting settlers and then driving them out to sell the ranches again, so he uses his guns and his fists to make things right for the settlers.

Produced by Sigmund Neufeld

Directed by Sam Newfield

The Actors: Bob Steele (Billy the Kid), Al St. John (Fuzzy), Louise Currie (Ann Roberts), Carleton Young (Jeff Blanchard), Charles King (henchman Ed Baker), Rex Lease (henchman Buck), Kenne Duncan (henchman Bragg), Forrest Taylor (Tom Roberts), Ted Adams (Sheriff, main part), Al Ferguson (Cobb Allen), Karl Hackett (attorney Martin), Edward Peil Sr. (Dave Barlow), Julian Rivero (Carlos), Blanca Vischer (Juanita), Richard Cramer (bartender), Art Dillard (posse rider), Curley Dresden (first Sheriff), Oscar Gahan (settler), Augie Gomez (henchman), Al Haskell (barfly), Carl Mathews (henchman), Joe McGuinn (henchman), George Morrell (settler), Tex Palmer (henchman), Wally West (henchman)

 

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Hot Lead Flying Fast and Furious

In a lot of the old cowboy westerns the good guys team with the town Sheriff to round up the bad guys, but when the good guy is a bad guy with a price on his head, the Sheriff must be removed from the action. As this cowboy story opens Billy the Kid along with his pals Fuzzy and Jeff are trapped in a small cabin with only one door . . . and the Sheriff with his posse are shooting hot lead at them, and it looks like the end of the line for Billy the Kid and his pals. Is this story going to end in the bloody death of Billy the Kid before it even gets going? Thanks to pal Fuzzy Billy the Kid makes a miraculous escape, but on the way to Jeff's uncle's ranch to hide out from the law they discover that his uncle is gone and new settlers are living in the ranch . . . What the heck is going on here? There is much folk lore about the real Billy the Kid helping folk that were in trouble with 'honest' bankers and such, and it seems that in real life while the law and the justice system were after Billy the Kid with a vengeance, he enjoyed much respect and friendship from the common people in the towns that he frequented. This story is along those lines, as Billy the Kid helps settlers who have been sold ranches by a town businessman who didn't own the ranches in the first place. After killing the ranch owners he would sell the ranches to new settlers, then run them off or kill them and sell the ranches again to the next batch of settlers. Billy the Kid and his pals use their guns and fists to fight the businessman and his henchmen when the law protects the bad guy because there is no proof of his crimes. On a personal note, I was positively tickled when I heard the voice of the first henchman in the movie who was robbing a gal with a wagon load of goods headed for her ranch. That man in black is my all-time favorite movie bad guy Charles King, a real big, soft teddy bear in real life, destined to play the bad guy in so many cowboy movies of the 1930's and 1940's. Anyway, back to our story . . . Billy the Kid needs to get the Sheriff out of the way so that he can have his way with the town villain, so he ties him up in a deserted shack and goes about getting the bad guys out of the way. I won't go into much more detail right here, as you will enjoy the story as it unfolds on your own. Let me just tell you that the movie opens with a Sheriff and posse shooting at Billy the Kid, and very near the end of the show Billy the Kid and Fuzzy are racing after the bad guys on horseback . . . and the Sheriff is hot and heavy chasing after them all, as the hot lead is once again flying through the air. The budget on bullets must have been pretty big for this motion picture, and I am convinced that it surely increased the adrenaline flowing in everyone in the audience. Pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter drizzled all over it and enjoy the show.

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