The Law of Contact

You Can't Beat the Law, aka Prison Mutiny (January 29, 1943)

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Prison Mutiny
 

Released on January 29, 1943: When a society man-about-town gets sent to prison after being framed for robbery he learns how to prosper in prison, but he may die when a prison break goes wrong.

Produced by Ralph M. Like

Directed by Phil Rosen

The Actors: Edward Norris (Johnny Gray), Joan Woodbury (Amy Duncan), Jack La Rue (Cain), Milburn Stone (Frank Sanders), Robert Homans (Mr. Duncan), Charles Jordan (henchman Creeper), Kenneth Harlan (first warden), Bryant Washburn (the Governor), Selmer Jackson (Mr. Bedford), Paul McVey (Death Row inmate Wayne), George Kamel (Jumpy), Willy Castello (Rico), Sam Bernard (Red Apple Sanders), Tristram Coffin (gang lawyer), Dick Curtis (prison guard), John Elliott (guard), Eddie Fetherston (convict), Inna Gest (Patricia Bedford), Mauritz Hugo (gang member Harry), Bruce Mitchell (prison guard), Cyril Ring (convict)

 
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Dames, Prison Breaks and Petunias

I'm thinking that fashion trends, especially with hair styles, may repeat every forty years or so? I remember the gals having 'big hair' in the 1980's, when girls teased their hair even more than they teased their men. I remember seeing movies of the Andrews Sisters from the 1940's with their big hair, and the two gals in this movie from 1943 also had that big hair. Today big hair is not the trend, but if the law of 40's repeats, by 2020 big hair will be back with a vengeance . . . I can hardly wait :~) . . . Wow . . . sorry about that digression, but my mind goes wherever it will, and that's where it went. There has long been a debate about crime and punishment that continues to this day . . . Is the purpose of prison to punish wrongdoing by inflicting pain up to and including death, or to reform criminals so they can become productive citizens when released, or to merely separate the bad guys out of society to keep them from continuing their criminal ways? I'm not sure that any of those three choices is the one and only answer, and I'm not sure if any of the three is wrong either. There is plenty of anecdotal evidence to support all three methods, and this movie did not end that debate back in 1943 when it hit the theaters. That aside, it is a pretty good crime movie with a couple of cinema favorites. Jack La Rue, usually typecast as the bad guy, is the head of the gang in prison, and Milburn Stone, the kindly doctor on the Gunsmoke television series, is the new prison warden with a different approach. Edward Norris is Johnny Gray, a big man on campus with plenty of money a bright future now living a fast and fun life with little regard for the serious things in life. He collects speeding tickets like I collect popcorn seasonings, and if it isn't fun and fast he doesn't want any part of it. His society girlfriend and her father convince him to settle down a bit and just as he agrees, a mob of bank robbers hijacks him and his car in a wild chase from the police. This leads to that and Johnny is framed as the head of the gang and is off to prison, full of hate and despise for the legal system and the cops that unjustly put him there. In prison he learns both the ways of the gang that controls the men and the ways of the new warden who wants to give Johnny a break. Johnny is torn between sticking with the powerful gang in prison or going straight, and it all comes to a head when the whole cell block breaks free and Johnny must align himself with either the convicts on their way out or stay behind and try to go straight. Pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn with warm melted butter drizzled over it and enjoy the show.

Bryant Washburn and Milburn Stone
Bryant Washburn and Milburn Stone
Bryant Washburn
Bryant Washburn
Edward Norris and Inna Gest
Edward Norris and Inna Gest
Edward Norris and Joan Woodbury
Edward Norris and Joan Woodbury
Edward Norris
Edward Norris
Edward Norris and Joan Woodbury
Edward Norris and Joan Woodbury
Edward Norris
Edward Norris
Edward Norris
Edward Norris
Frank La Rue and George Kamel
Frank La Rue and George Kamel
Inna Gest and Edward Norris
Inna Gest and Edward Norris
Jack La Rue and Edward Norris
Jack La Rue and Edward Norris
Jack La Rue
Jack La Rue
Jack La Rue meets Edward Norris
Jack La Rue meets Edward Norris
Jack La Rue
Jack La Rue meets Edward Norris
Joan Woodbury and Milburn Stone
Joan Woodbury and Milburn Stone
Joan Woodbury and Edward Norris
Joan Woodbury and Edward Norris
Joan Woodbury
Joan Woodbury
Kenneth Harlan
Kenneth Harlan
Milburn Stone and Kenneth Harlan
Milburn Stone and Kenneth Harlan
Milburn Stone and Edward Norris
Milburn Stone and Edward Norris
Milburn Stone and Joan Woodbury
Milburn Stone and Joan Woodbury
Milburn Stone
Milburn Stone
Paul McVey
Paul McVey
Robert Homans and Milburn Stone
Robert Homans and Milburn Stone
Robert Homans and Jack La Rue
Robert Homans and Jack La Rue
Robert Homans, Milburn Stone and Joan Woodbury
Robert Homans, Milburn Stone and Joan Woodbury
Robert Homans and Milburn Stone
Robert Homans and Milburn Stone
Robert Homans and Milburn Stone
Robert Homans and Milburn Stone
Selmer Jackson and Edward Norris
Selmer Jackson and Edward Norris
Selmer Jackson
Selmer Jackson
Tristram Coffin and Charles Jordan
Tristram Coffin and Charles Jordan
Willy Castello and Edward Norris
Willy Castello and Edward Norris