Delinquent Daughters (July 15, 1944)

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Delinquent Daughters
 

Released on July 15, 1944: Three teenage high school girls get mixed up with boys, cars, nightclubs and crime and it will end in death for one of them.

Produced by Albert Herman and Donald C. McKean

Directed by Albert Herman

The Actors: June Carlson (June Thompson), Fifi D'Orsay (Mimi), Teala Loring (Sally Higgins), Mary Bovard (Betty Smith), Margia Dean (Francine Van Pelt), Johnny Duncan (Rocky Webster), Joe Devlin (Detective Hanahan), Jimmy Zahner (Jerry Sykes), John Dawson (Nick Gordon), Frank McGlynn Sr. (Judge Craig), Parker Gee (Steve Cronin, newspaper reporter), Warren Mills (Roy Ford), John Christian (Mr. Thompson), Frank Stephens (Mr. Webster), Floyd Criswell (Detective Joe Miller), John Valentine (Mr. Moffatt, school principal), Belle Thomas (waitress), Sheila Roberts (waitress), Norval Mitchell (paymaster), Juan de la Cruz (Mr. Barrows), Sheilah Roddick (Mrs. Van Pelt), John Bridges (candy store owner), Roy Butler (diner counter man), Willis Clare (Mr. Higgins), George Kirby (gas station attendant), Patricia Knox (teen), Wally West (customer)

 

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Teenage Girls at the Merry-Go-Round

There are a lot of reasons not to watch this movie . . . The only surviving print is well worn and a bit fuzzy and dark . . . There are a few minutes in the middle where the screen seems to be black with only voices and you must use your imagination to picture the action. . . There are no superstars in the movie to watch. But if you like to time-travel to days gone by, this is a very unique picture of 1944, unlike any other movie from that year. If you were old enough to go to the movies in 1944 you would have seen a few World War II adventures, of course romantic comedies, and gangsters. . . . Machine gun toting tough guys shooting it out with the cops . . . I don’t know of another movie from the beginning of motion pictures up to the release of this story that deals with teenage high school girls and crime. There were the East End Kids, later known as the Bowery Boys, but teenage crime didn’t bloom in theaters until us post World War II baby boomers came of age in the mid 1950’s through the 1960’s, when teenagers ruled the world. I understand that when this movie hit the theaters that it was very, very controversial . . . While the subject matter seems a bit old-fashioned and well-worn today, it broke new boundaries in 1944 with not one, but two scenes of teen girls fighting with each other. . . . Pulling hair, punching, ripping clothing . . . Nothing ever seen on screen before. . . . And three distinct girls with three distinct personalities that probably summed up the three predominant types of teenagers of 1944. The leading teenage girl is June, a cute blonde girl who is a bit on the shy side, and conflicted between being a traditional ‘good’ girl and enjoying life as a wild child party girl. Sally is the hard as nails party girl ready to try anything and anyone to enjoy life to the fullest like no teenage girl has ever done before . . . She could stand up to Humphrey Bogart of Jimmy Cagney or any other movie gangster and probably come away the winner. Then there is Betty . . . Betty has existed since the beginning of time, and is still seen today. Betty is a squeaky voiced smiling idiot who has no idea what is going on around her, but boy is she fun to be around. When she exclaims with a happy grin that she never gets headaches, and Sally sarcastically tells her that it is because she doesn’t have a head, Betty laughs and agrees, not even knowing what Sally means. As I absorbed the personalities of the teenage girls and boys I was at first a bit bored . . . These characters are familiar from the movies of the 1960’s and onward, but remember, this is 1944, and these kind of personalities haven’t been seen on the big screen before, especially not in a juvenile crime setting. . . This is a ‘B’ movie, without big stars, but it is cutting edge very controversial stuff for 1944 audiences. Pop a big bowl of white kernel popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter drizzled over it and enjoy the show.

Fifi D'Orsay
Fifi D'Orsay
Frank McGlynn Sr. and Johnny Duncan
Frank McGlynn Sr. and Johnny Duncan
Frank McGlynn Sr.
Frank McGlynn Sr.
Frank Stephens and Frank McGlynn Sr.
Frank Stephens and Frank McGlynn Sr.
Jimmy Zahner and John Dawson
Jimmy Zahner and John Dawson
Jimmy Zahner
Jimmy Zahner
Joe Devlin and Fifi D'Orsay
Joe Devlin and Fifi D'Orsay
Joe Devlin, John Dawson and Fifi D'Orsay
Joe Devlin, John Dawson and Fifi D'Orsay
Joe Devlin and John Valentine
Joe Devlin and John Valentine
Joe Devlin, Teala Loring and John Valentine
Joe Devlin, Teala Loring and John Valentine
Joe Devlin
Joe Devlin
John Christian and June Carlson
John Christian and June Carlson
John Christian
John Christian
John Dawson and Fifi D'Orsay
John Dawson and Fifi D'Orsay
John Dawson
John Dawson
Johnny Duncan
Johnny Duncan
Johnny Duncan
Johnny Duncan
June Carlson and Johnny Duncan
June Carlson and Johnny Duncan
June Carlson, Mary Bovard and Teala Loring
June Carlson, Mary Bovard and Teala Loring
June Carlson
June Carlson
Mary Bovard
Mary Bovard
Parker Gee, Joe Devlin and John Dawson
Parker Gee, Joe Devlin and John Dawson
Parker Gee and Joe Devlin
Parker Gee and Joe Devlin
Teala Loring
Teala Loring
Teala Loring and John Dawson
Teala Loring and John Dawson
Teala Loring
Teala Loring
Warren Mills
Warren Mills