The Violent Years (1956)

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The Violent Years
 

Released in 1956: Four high school daughters of prominent town citizens form a gang that robs and rapes men at gunpoint, and finally become cop killers in a wild shoot-out at school.

Directed by William Morgan and Edward D. Wood Jr.

The Actors: Jean Moorhead (Paula Parkins), Barbara Weeks (Jane Parkins), Art Millan (Carl Parkins), Theresa Hancock (Georgia), Joanne Cangi (Geraldine), Gloria Farr (Phyllis), Glenn Corbett (Barney Stetson, reporter), Lee Constant (Sheila), I. Stanford Jolley (Judge Clara), Timothy Farrell (Lieutenant Holmes), F. Chan McClure (Detective Artman), Bruno Metsa (Manny), Harry Keaton (the doctor).

 

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Dad was a preacher, and if he watched this movie I imagine that he would not even hesitate to tell the world that the problem with kids in the late 1950's was that new, devil inspired music that they call 'Rock 'n Roll' - no good could come from listening to it. And even worse are those new dances that rock music inspires. Why, just the names of them are outrageous - like the bunny hop, and the bop, and boogie-woogie - now tell me, what good could come from something named 'boogie-woogie?' Not only that, but after watching this movie he probably would have said, "Son, you can be very thankful that you do not live in a wealthy family. There are blessing to being poor, and this movie highlights that fact." . . . .

Well, he always meant well, and always put a positive spin on our lack of abundance when it came to money, but thankfully I have finally grown out of that thinking. Having enough money to live an abundant life should be the goal of every youngster. And I'm not talking about jumping on the treadmill of the rat race to the top. I'm talking about finding and following your passion into a new world. Every one of us is a unique treasure from Heaven. Every one of us . . . . yes, even you . . . . has a passion inside that has the potential to carry you to an abundant life of fantastic experiences. You can do something creative with your hands and your mind that will not only benefit others, but bring back riches to you that you might only dream about today. Just find that passion and take positive steps towards it every day, and before you know it you will be on the path to a uniquely rewarding future. Honest. Just discover what your passion really is by sitting still every morning for a few minutes. First silently ask in your mind what your passion is, and then sit quietly and listen for the answer. It will come, and it will open a whole new world to you. It may not come the first time you meditate, but keep doing it for a few days. The answer will come and start you on a journey that will be wildly exciting. Honest.

One of my mentors recently told me this, and I've just gotta share it: "Jimbo, if it was just about surviving, getting by, and keeping things the way they are, then how would you explain imagination? If it was just about sacrifice, selflessness, and altruism, then how would you explain desire? And if it was just about thinking, reflection, and spiritual stuff, then how would you explain the physical world? Get the picture, Jimbo? Want it all. That's what it's there for. Dream about it, decide how to take one step in that direction, and keep putting more steps after the first one. Soon you will be in a new life more exciting than any old movie - and you know how exciting old movies can be."

If you are an Ed Wood fan, you will really enjoy this one, because he not only co-directed it, but he wrote it. And what a great story plot - take straight from the 1930's big city gangster movies, with a 1950's twist that only his mind could conceive. A gang of four teens robs gas stations at gunpoint, terrorizes couples on the dark and lonely 'lovers lane' and creates a small town crime wave that is rocking the cops. Nothing terribly unusual so far . . . but wait . . . this gang is made up of four beautiful teenage girls! Yup, you heard right. Four teenage girls from well-to-do families go on a crime spree that ends up in one of the wildest shoot-outs with the cops that you've ever seen. And they even have an older gal as a fence for their stolen loot. Just about the only part that men play in this twisted crime thriller is as victims of their madness. Pop some white kernel popcorn with plenty of warm melted butter and get ready to watch a crime adventure in the 1950's as only the mind of Ed Wood could create.

Art Millan
Art Millan is the newspaper owner talking to his star reporter.
Barbara Weeks and Art Millan
Barbara Weeks and Art Millan
Barbara Weeks and Jean Moorhead
Barbara Weeks and Jean Moorhead
Barbara Weeks
Barbara Weeks at the breakfast table with Art Millan
Bruno Metsa and Jean Moorhead
Bruno Metsa and Jean Moorhead
Jean Moorhead robbing a gas station attendant
Jean Moorhead robbing a gas station attendant with her gun.
Edmund Cobb
Genn Corbett
Glenn Corbett and Art Millan
Glenn Corbett and Art Millan
Glenn Corbett
Glenn Corbett talking to Art Millan
Gloria Farr and Joanne Cangi robbing a girl on Lover's Lane
Gloria Farr and Joanne Cangi robbing a girl on Lover's Lane.
Gloria Farr
Gloria Farr in the opening credits for The Violent Years
Gloria Farr, 1956
Gloria Farr in 1956
Harry Keaton
Harry Keaton
I. Stanford Jolley, 1956
I. Stanford Jolley in 1956
I. Stanford Jolley
I. Stanford Jolley as the judge in The Violent Years
Jean Moorhead
Jean Moorhead, 1956
Jean Moorhead and Art Millan
Jean Moorhead and Art Millan
Jean Moorhead and Glenn Corbett
Jean Moorhead and Glenn Corbett
Jean Moorhead and Lee Constant
Jean Moorhead and Lee Constant
Jean Moorhead
Jean Moorhead in the opening credits for The Violent Years.
Jean Moorhead
Jean Moorhead gets ready to rape a boy on Lover's Lane.
Jean Moorhead robs a boy on Lover's Lane
Jean Moorhead robs a boy on Lover's Lane
Jean Moorhead
Jean Moorhead in 1956
Joanne Cangi and Theresa Hancock
Joanne Cangi and Theresa Hancock
Joanne Cangi
Joanne Cangi in the opening credits of The Violent Years.
Lee Constant and Jean Moorhead discuss the next caper
Lee Constant and Jean Moorhead discuss their next caper.
Lee Constant
Lee Constant in The Violent Years
Theresa Hancock in The Violent Years
Theresa Hancock in the opening credits of The Violent Years.